Bob Ezrin convinced Roger Waters to drop the song, although elements were reworked and recycled into other tracks.

 

Extremely little is known about the track “Death Disco”. It was on Roger Waters’ original demo Bricks In The Wall, but it disappeared very quickly after that. If Pink Floyd ever recorded “Death Disco” (which is doubtful), none of those recordings ever made it onto the subsequent production demos.

“Death Disco” appeared fairly early on Side 2 of Roger’s original demo cassette. It was sequenced third on the side between “Follow The Worms” (what would become “Waiting For The Worms”) and a classical guitar version of “Is There Anybody Out There?”.

Music critic Janet Huck described it as a “silly, hackneyed song… in which a DJ harangued the audience”[1] with fascist insults. Co-producer Bob Ezrin convinced Waters to drop the song, although elements were reworked and recycled to became the basis of similar lyrics later heard in “In The Flesh”. The song also contained a guitar riff that was later worked into “Young Lust”.

The track was not included as part of the snippets of Bricks In The Wall/Roger Waters’ Original Demo that were released on the Work In Progress discs of The Wall: Immersion. To date, it is unreleased and has never been available in any form through legitimate or bootleg channels.

I’m actually glad that “Death Disco” never made it onto the album. Regardless of how the song may have sounded — the style of music, etc., it turns out that “Disco wasn’t forever” like we thought at the time. The title alone would have dated the track and possibly the album.

Some Pink Floyd resources state the title as “The Death of Disco” or “The Death of Cisco”. Both are incorrect.

On June 29, 1979, the band Public Image Ltd. released a single called “Death Disco”. This is not the same song.

 

What Got Cut

  • All of it. Bits of it were later recycled into other tracks on The Wall.

 

Alternate Versions

None.

 

Last update: April 15, 2017


1- “Up Against The Wall”, Huck, Janet, February 1980, from Pink Floyd through the eyes of…, edited by Bruno MacDonald. p. 127

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